It’s Alive! Videographic Frankenstein

 

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Videographic Frankenstein–the exhibition that I am curating at Stanford–opens today. The show runs from Sept. 26 through Oct. 26, 2018 in the Dr. Sidney and Iris Miller Discussion Space, McMurtry Building.

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Works featured:

Frankenstein (2018), 2018
Matthew Fishel
Silent Animation Loop

Spark of Being, 2010
Bill Morrison
Found Footage Film, 1:07:11

Frankenstein’s Television, 2018
Jason Mittell
Video, 10:02

Mad Science/Love and the Body in Pieces, 2018
Allison de Fren
Video, 17:18

The Meaning of “Animation” in Edison’s FRANKENSTEIN, 2017
Shane Denson
Video, 12:57

Red, Not Blood: Godard, Frankenstein, and Eastman Red, 2018
Carlos Valladares
Video, 6:46

Persona versus Frankenstein, 2015
David Verdeure, a.k.a. Filmscalpel
Video, 4:15

On Galvanism: Electricity, Frankenstein, and the Moving Image, 2018
Spencer Slovic
Video, 7:30

Sight and Sound Conspire: Monstrous Audio-Vision in James Whale’s FRANKENSTEIN (1931), 2015
Shane Denson
Video, 8:47

Questioning the Human Machine in EX MACHINA, 2016
Allison de Fren
Video, 10:26

Horror and Humor: Frankenstein’s Comic Offspring, 2018
Lester D. Friedman and Kristine Vann
Video, 17:38

The exhibition was made possible by a Frankenstein@200 Initiative grant from the Medicine and the Muse Program at Stanford.

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More information about the exhibition can be found here.

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Stanford – Leuphana Summer Academy 2019

Stanford-Leuphana

Introducing the inaugural Stanford – Leuphana Summer Academy:

Stanford–Leuphana Summer Academy 2019

»Against presentism. Historicizing mediality«

Thinking about technological changes or revolutions is often marked by a presentist, ahistorical mode of thinking and debate.  Consider the contemporary discussion about »digital culture« and its technologies.  The tropes mobilized are usually technicist and innovation- or even disruption-oriented, in both their affirmative and critical guises.  Little attention is given to historical precursors of technologically driven social change.  Even less attention is given to concepts and theories from other historical periods that might help investigate and understand our current predicament.

The Stanford-Leuphana Summer Academy seeks to change perspectives by focusing on concepts and theories that break with the myopia of presentism.  In seeking to formulate a new research area in terms of other periods (e.g. premodern or early modern) and fields (e.g. anthropology, religious studies, art history, etc.), this 5-day seminar seeks to historicize mediality in productive and innovative ways.  If »digital cultures« are not only modernity’s final product, but also brought an end to modernity, then it might be inspiring to think about digital cultures beyond or apart from modern concepts.  What terms are historically specific for an age or culture, and what concepts apply broadly to various phenomena from the premodern to the present age?  In what ways do preliterate, oral, or ritualistic cultures intersect with digital modes of information?  How can these other perspectives change our thinking about the present?

Key terms:»ritual«, »authorship«, »sovereignty«, »arcane«, »orality«, »participation«, »public sphere«, »social construction of time«, »art«, »literature«, »history«, »philosophy«, »history of science«, »historiography«

 

Date: June 24 – 28, 2019

Location: Stanford Berlin, »Haus Cramer«, Pacelliallee 18, 14195 Berlin

 

Faculty

  1. Timon Beyes (Sociology of Organisation and Culture, Leuphana)
  2. Shane Denson (Film and Media Studies, Stanford)
  3. Elena Esposito (Sociology, Modena/Reggio Emilia)
  4. Marisa Galvez (French, Italian, and German Studies, Stanford)
  5. Hans-Ulrich Gumbrecht (Comparative Literature and German Studies, Stanford)
  6. Thomas Macho (Cultural History, IFK Vienna)
  7. Karla Oeler (Film and Media Studies, Stanford)
  8. Claus Pias (History and Epistemology of Media, Leuphana)
  9. Fred Turner (Communication, Stanford)
  10. Sigrid Weigel (Literature and Cultural Science, Berlin)

 

Application

All applications must be submitted electronically in PDF format.  Please submit your CV (1-2 pages) along with a 500-word abstract of your topic, and a short letter of intent explaining why you would like to attend this Summer Academy.

Please use the following naming convention for your application files:Lastname_CV.pdf, Lastname_Abstract.pdf, Lastname_Letter_of_Intent.pdf.

Please email your applications to Nelly Y. Pinkrah (nelly.pinkrah@leuphana.de).

The deadline for applications for the summer school is December 15, 2018.  All applicants will be informed about the selection of participants by end of January 2019.  The working language of the Summer Academy will be English.

The organizers will cover travel (economy) and accommodation costs for the time of the summer school.  No additional fees will be charged.

Contact

Claus Pias (pias@leuphana.de)

Please spread the word to graduate students who might benefit from an interdisciplinary effort to rethink mediality and its relation to history.

FrankensteinsDeepDream

Creation scene and aftermath, as described in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (Chapter 5, 1831 edition) and interpreted by Cris Valenzuela’s text-to-image machine-learning demo (http://t2i.cvalenzuelab.com) utilizing AttnGAN (Attentional Generative Adversarial Networks).

Made for the upcoming Videographic Frankenstein exhibition at the Department of Art & Art History, Stanford University (Sept. 26 – Oct. 26, 2018). More info here: https://art.stanford.edu/exhibitions/videographic-frankenstein

Let’s Make a Monster — Exhibition at Shriram Center for Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering

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Works from the course “Let’s Make a Monster: Critical Making,” which I co-taught this quarter with my art practice colleague Paul DeMarinis, are currently on display in the Shriram Center for Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering at Stanford University. The show, which officially opened today, is up through Friday, June 8.

We are particularly excited to take this work across campus and show it in the context of a space devoted to cutting-edge engineering work, where we hope that it provokes thought and discussion about the transformations of technology, experience, and life itself taking place in Silicon Valley and elsewhere. Thanks especially to Prof. Drew Endy for his help in facilitating and making this show possible.

Here are just a few glimpses of the work on display.

Nora Wheat, Decode (2018)

Hieu Minh Pham, The Knot (2018)

Raphael Palefsky-Smith, Brick (2018) — more info here

David Zimmerman, Eigenromans I-III (2018)

Jennifer Xilo, Mirror for Our Upturned Palms (2018)

Jackie Langelier, Creepers (2018)