Images of Discorrelation, MECS Lecture July 3, 2019 (Video)

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On July 3, 2019, I delivered a talk related to my forthcoming book, Discorrelated Images, at Leuphana Universität’s Institute of Advanced Study on Media Cultures of Computer Simulation (MECS), during my fellowship in Lüneburg. The video is now online, and can be viewed here (or the direct link to YouTube).

Thanks to Florian Hoof for the kind invitation, and for everyone at MECS and the Center for Digital Cultures for hosting me this summer!

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Talks and Events in Bogotá, September 2019

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I am excited to visit Bogotá, Colombia for the first time this coming September, where I will be giving a series of workshops and public lectures. And I am equally excited to see these very cool images that the people there made for my visit!

The public lectures are as follows:

September 10, 2019 (time TBD): “Animating Frankenstein: Film, Comics, and Serialized Visual Culture.” Universidad Jorge Tadeo Lozano.

September 12, 2019 (6pm): “Discorrelation and the Post-Perceptual Image.” Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

I will also be holding some workshops at the Visual Research Laboratory in the Program in History and Theory of Art, Architecture, and the City at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia. Thanks very much to the people there for making this happen, and thanks especially to Visual Research Lab director Zenaida Osorio Porras for the invitation!

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Talks and Events: Germany/Switzerland, June-July 2019

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This summer, I will be spending a month in Germany, along with a short trip to Switzerland, for a series of talks and other events. Here is the full list:

June 21: “The Algorithmic Nickelodeon” — Screening and presentation at symposium on “Videographic Criticism: Aesthetics and Methods of the Video Essay,” ACUD-Kino Berlin

June 23-28: Stanford-Leuphana Summer Academy 2019: “Against Presentism” — at Stanford Berlin Campus

June 26, 6pm: “Desktop Horror: Screening Fear/Fearing Screens” — Presentation at the JFK Institute for North American Studies, Freie Universität Berlin

June 29: “Discorrelation and Seamfulness” — Presentation at the media-philosophical workshop on “Reflexivity in Digital Media,” Zürcher Hochschule der Künste, Zurich

July 1-19: Research Fellowship at the Institute for Advanced Study on Media Cultures of Computer Simulation — Leuphana University, Lüneburg

July 3: “Images of Discorrelation” — Presentation in the Media Cultures of Computer Simulation/Center for Digital Cultures Evening Colloquium Series, Leuphana University, Lüneburg

July 10: “Post-Cinematic Realism” — Presentation in the Sprache, Migration, und Vielfalt series at the Leibniz Universität Hannover

“Discorrelation and Seamfulness” at ZHdK, June 29

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On June 29, 2019, I will be presenting work from my forthcoming book, Discorrelated Images, at the media-philosophical workshop on “Reflexivity in Digital Media” at the Zürcher Hochschule der Künste. Thanks to Katerina Krtilova for organizing, and thanks to Dieter Mersch for the invitation to be a part of this!

Writing at the Speed of Thinking — Miyako Inoue at Digital Aesthetics Workshop

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For our final event of this year’s Digital Aesthetics Workshop (which, we can now confirm, will return next year!), Stanford’s own Miyako Inoue will be presenting her current research on the Japanese typewriter. Her session promises to consider the effects of media on thought, to push technology studies towards the history of empire, and to argue with Friedrich Kittler. Needless to say, we are thrilled to have her!

The event takes place on Tuesday, May 29, from 5-7 in the Board Room of the Stanford Humanities Center.

There is no pre-circulated reading. However, attendees are encouraged to familiarize themselves with Kittler’s “Typewriter” chapter in Gramophone, Film, Typewriter.

RSVP to deacho@stanford.edu

Snacks and wine will be served

Dr. Miyako Inoue

Writing at the Speed of Thinking: The Japanese Kana Typewriter and the Rehabilitation of the Male Hand

Tuesday, May 29, 5:00-7:00

The invention of the Japanese syllabic (kana) typewriter in the beginning of the 20th century was a modular articulation between the Japanese syllabary and the engineered metal body of the English typewriter. With keys and type bars for Japanese syllabaries neatly conjoined with it, the kana typewriter promised Japan’s industrial efficiency and productivity of repetitive inscription labor. While the kana-typewriter was originally used in business and government offices to streamline the production of invoices, order forms, utility bills, and so on, the postwar portable models attracted allies for personal use among male intellectuals, industrialists, scientists, and colonial officers, for whom the kana typewriter meant “the liberation from Chinese characters,” or Japan’s break from “Asia” (and its return as a colonizer), and a renewed connection with Western industrial modernity. Friedrich Kittler argues that the western typewriter led to the de-sexualization of writing, liberating (hand)writing from its organic and exclusive ties with the male hand and allowing women to enter the white-collar workplace as typists. In this presentation, I would like to discuss how the kana-typewriter led, in fact, to the re-sexualization of writing as a masculine enterprise, and to the reunion of the man’s hand with language, as its portability allowed elite Japanese (type)writers in international scientific communities, in colonial administrations and associated overseas business communities to synchronize writing and thinking and to re-enact the western subject-position of auto-affect in writing.

Miyako Inoue is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Stanford University, where she also has a courtesy appointment with the Department of Linguistics. She teaches linguistic anthropology and the anthropology of Japan. Her first book, Vicarious Language: the Political Economy of Gender and Speech in Japan (U. of California Press), examines a phenomenon commonly called “women’s language” in Japanese modern society, and offers a genealogy showing its critical linkage with Japan’s national and capitalist modernity. Professor Inoue is currently working on a book-length project on a social history of “verbatim” in Japanese. She traces the historical development of the Japanese shorthand technique used in the Diet for its proceedings since the late 19th century, and of the stenographic typewriter introduced to the Japanese court for the trial record after WWII. She is interested in learning what it means to be faithful to others by copying their speech, and how the politico-semiotic rationality of such stenographic modes of fidelity can be understood as a technology of a particular form of governance, namely, liberal governance.

Discorrelated Images at University of Toronto, May 16, 2019

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This Thursday, May 16, I will be at the Cinema Studies Institute at the University of Toronto to talk about “Discorrelated Images” — the subject of my forthcoming book by the same title.

The next day, I’ll be speaking at the Spiral Film and Philosophy Conference about the idea of “animation” in a post-cinematic media regime.

Looking forward to being in Toronto and seeing lots of familiar faces!

Animation and Discorrelation: Two Talks in Toronto

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Next month, May 16-18, I will be in Toronto, where I’ll give two talks:

First, on May 16, I’ll be talking about my book project Discorrelated Images at the Cinema Studies Institute at the University of Toronto.

Then, on May 17, I will be giving a talk titled “Cinematic and Post-Cinematic Animation: Medium, Theme, Phenomenology” at the Spiral Film and Philosophy Conference (the theme of which is It’s Alive! Film/Form/Life). The full conference program is online, here: https://spiralfilmphilosophy.ca/program-2019/