DEMO Video: Post-Cinema: 24fps@44100Hz

As Karin posted yesterday (and as I reblogged this morning), our collaborative artwork Post-Cinema: 24fps@44100Hz will be on display (and on sale) from January 15-23 at The Carrack Modern Art gallery in Durham, NC, as part of their annual Winter Community Show.

Exhibiting augmented reality pieces always brings with it a variety of challenges — including technical ones and, above all, the need to inform viewers about how to use the work. So, for this occasion, I’ve put together this brief demo video explaining the piece and how to view it. The video will be displayed on a digital picture frame mounted on the wall below the painting. Hopefully it will be both eye-catching enough to attract passersby and it will effectively communicate the essential information about the process and use of the work.

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Videographic PechaKucha

Inspired by Jason Mittell’s latest blog post on “Videographic Deformations,” in which Jason discusses an exercise we did at last summer’s NEH digital humanities workshop on Scholarship in Sound & Image in the context of what Lisa Samuels and Jerome McGann call “deformative criticism,” I’ve finally gotten around to uploading a multiscreen compilation of “videographic PechaKuchas” that I made in Middlebury, based on the videos made by all the participants in the workshop. Be sure to check out Jason’s post for the essential context, and: Enjoy!

(For best image quality, check out the video on vimeo, where you can view it in 1080p HD.)

Post-Cinema: 24fps@44100Hz

The New Krass

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This piece, consisting of an acrylic painting (24″x24″) and an augmented reality (AR) digital-video overlay, is a collaborative artwork made together with my husband Shane Denson. It will be featured on the cover of the soon forthcoming book Post-Cinema: Theorizing 21st Century Film, which Shane edited along with Julia Leyda, and it will be on display at The Carrack Modern Art gallery in Durham, NC from January 15-23, 2016.

For the painting, I started with a photo that I took of our dog Evie lying in front of another of my paintings, Glitchesarelikewildanimals!No.1, which itself was based on a digitally glitched (databent) picture of Evie. I subjected the new photo to a similar process, first turning it into a video in a nonlinear editing program (Final Cut Pro) and then deforming the video by sonifying it in an audio editing program (audacity).

You can see the…

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Out Now: [in]Transition 2.4

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The latest issue of [in]Transition: Journal of Videographic Film & Moving Image Studies has just been published. This is a special issue featuring video essays that emerged out of the NEH workshop on videographic criticism that I attended last summer at Middlebury College, organized by Jason Mittell and Christian Keathley. In addition to my video essay “Sight and Sound Conspire: Monstrous Audio-Vision in James Whale’s Frankenstein (1931)” — with peer reviews by Steven Shaviro and Drew Morton — the special issue also contains great pieces by Allison de Fren, Patrick Keating, Jaap Kooijman, and Michael Talbott. Check it out!